NGO

Thailand’s Equitable Education Fund (EEF) has announced 500 volunteer teacher will be deployed to provide educational support for students in rural areas. The volunteers will assist students taking part in a long-distance learning program introduced as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The volunteers teachers will work to support 279 rural schools across 45 provinces in Thailand. Schools which are conducting long-distance classes via an on-air platform broadcast on TV.

Udom Wongsing, director of the educators’ quality office at the EEF, said the volunteers teacher, will be provided with clearly laid out assignments. The teachers will visit students at their homes in villages. Answering queries the student may have about subjects studied during TV long-distance classes.

Many students may have questions but have no one to ask, Mr. Udom Said. Above all since the on-air learning experience involves one-way communication. Saying volunteers teachers will also offer students guidance on how to prevent Covid-19 transmission.

The EEF has worked with local school in recruiting the volunteers. Many of of whom will make home visits in remote mountainous areas and islands in Thailand.

Solution to TV learning problems

“Long-distance learning on TV isn’t easy to adapt to. Parents may not be able to help their children grapple with the content of some on-air classes,” he said.

The volunteers, will be on hand to assist about 80,000 students nationwide, will be fresh graduates with a teaching degree. Also temporary-contract teachers between jobs and retired teachers, the Bangkok Post reports.

The volunteers will also receive fund to cover their travel expenses and meals, he said. Adding they are expected to work at least until the delayed new school term starts on July 1.

Supachoke Piyasant, director of Ban Huay Rai Samakkee School in Chiang Rai, said the volunteers can help provide a solution to TV learning problems in some areas.

Schools in Thailand Gearing Up to Reopen

Thailand’s Education Ministry has announced schools in Thailand are gearing up in preparation for reopening after being closed due to Covid-19.  A ministry survey found 60-70% of students are not ready to use TV or the internet for their studies.

Education Minister Nataphol Teepsuwan said the ministry adjusted its previous plan from airing lessons via TV classes for long distance learning as part of measures to prevent the spread of Covid-19.

The ministry planned to allow kindergarten, primary, and junior high school students to learn through the Distance Learning Television (DLTV) platform. High school students will be studying content delivered by the Office of the Basic Education Commission.

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UN Environment, UnSchool and thousands of individuals are amplifying calls to action for sustainable lifestyles globally, through the digital challenge “15 Ways in 15 Days.” The challenge outlines everyday lifestyle swaps that individuals can make to support the growing shift toward global sustainable living.

UN Environment, a partner in the Sustainable Lifestyles and Education Programme (co-led by SEI), and the UnSchool of Disruptive Design developed the Anatomy of Action: a practical, evidence-based online resource that equips individuals to act and create sustainable lifestyles, to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals

The #AnatomyOfAction launched at UNESCO in Paris on 12 September with keynote speakers, social media influencers and international experts; followed by the UNEP “15 Ways in 15 Days” Take Action Challenge from 15–30 September.

“September is a crucial month due to the Climate Change and SDG Summits, and world leaders will gather at UN Headquarters in New York to review progress and identify measures to accelerate the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. We can and should contribute by changing our lifestyles and asking our governments and companies to make sustainable living the default. The evidence-based actions give us the power to make the waves of change we – and the planet – need,” said Garrette Clark, Sustainable Lifestyles Programme Officer at UN Environment.

The latest data shows that there are five key lifestyle areas of impact that anyone, anywhere can take to make a positive impact.

Evidence shows that if enough people start to adopt the changes outlined in the Anatomy of Action key lifestyle areas of food, stuff, move, money, and fun, then the global momentum of collective action will help shift the economy and address pressing social and environmental issues.

Each of the five main themes have a finger and three actions to remember the theme by. This is the Anatomy of Action, a handy action set for everyday sustainable living.

“Every individual has the power to act today”

These five areas of action form part of our everyday living needs and lifestyle choices that hold the potential – if enough people swap their actions – to support the global changes we need to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

“While government and business leaders certainly need to do much more to inspire and facilitate more sustainable lifestyles, this campaign reminds us that there is no reason to wait. Every individual has the power to act today. With this challenge we actually can discover surprisingly easy, cool and fun ways for saving our world,” said Bas de Leeuw, Managing Director of the World Resources Forum and Member of the Club of Rome.

The Take Action Challenge works through global influencers to engage audiences in making conscious choices. In this way it aims to get traction through social media and create a buzz to move the needle of public opinion and engage civil society in a global transformation towards sustainable living.

“This unique initiative is an opportunity for people to showcase their own actions through social media, contribute to reaching several of the SDGs and create a sustainable lifestyle in a fun and engaging way,” said Andrea Norgren, project leader of the Sustainable Lifestyles and Education Programme at SEI.

UN Environment is a member of the One Planet Network and the Sustainable Lifestyles and Education Programme. The programme is co-led by Sweden (through SEI) and Japan (through the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies).

#AnatomyOfAction #AllHandsOnDeck #GlobalGoals
@unschools @unenvironment @10YFP @SEIresearch

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The American Women’s Club of Thailand Community Projects Team, led by Linda Jennings and Catherine Culwell kicked off the first of many community projects we hope to complete over the next few weeks and months to help those that have been severely impacted by the current Covid-19 Pandemic. 
 
The 1500 Khlong Toei Meal Box Project consisted of creating 1,500 Meal Boxes of Chicken, Rice & Boiled Eggs that were then distributed inside Khlong Toei in coordination with the Duang Prateep Foundation and Khlong Toei Community Leader Khun Fai who helped identify the need for the community to us.  
 
A huge THANK YOU goes out to the amazing Anantara Siam Team, without their assistance, guidance and kitchen facilities, I am not sure we would have been able to pull this off as easily as we did.
A special recognition to the team that pulled this all together and made it happen. 
 
Linda Jennings – AWC Community Projects Lead 
Catherine Culwell – AWC Community Projects
Jenny Littlewood – AWC
Libby Heath – AWC
Maxine Margolis – AWC
 
Daniel Simon – General Manager, Anantara Siam
Khun Apisak – Banquet Chef, Anantara Siam
Khun Pongsri – Anantara Siam
Khun Patcharee  – Anantara Siam
Khun Nah  – Anantara Siam
Kun Chalida – Anantara Siam
 
Lily Aphiwan Sungden- LocalAlike
Khun Fai – Khlong Toei Community Leader
Duang Prateep Foundation
 
Thank you all for volunteering your time, knowledge and experience in making the 1,500 Khlong Toei Meal Box Project a success. 
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The International Women’s Club of Thailand (IWC), led by President Mukda Sorensen (4th from left), 
recently donated the sum of Baht 152,500 to Ramathibodi Foundation to support doctors and nurses of Ramathibodi Hospital who are working hard and risking their lives on a daily basis, caring for those infected with the Covid-19 as well as for others.  The donation was a result of funds collectively contributed by generous members of the Club.
Pictured from left are:   Frances Siranovic; Jinee Russell;   Manjit Walia;  IWC 2020 President Mukda Sorensen;  Prof. Dr. Pornchai Simaroj; Dr. Juvady Leopairut; Rita Indhewat; and Carmen de Schuster.
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“SOS” raises money for protecting the most vulnerables during health & economic long-term economic crisis

While Thailand is facing an unprecedented crisis, Scholars of Sustenance Foundation (SOS) raises the alarm of food insecurity’s drastic growth. The leading food rescue Foundation in the country launches today a donation campaign to cope with Covid19’s terrible economic and social consequences.

Food insecurity is sadly on the rise as unemployment skyrockets. As many as 10 million Thais could lose their job in the next few months if the current Covid-19 epidemic continues, announced the Federation of Thai Industries. This could lead to a a tremendous increase in food relief needs.

On the other hand, restaurants and hotels’ food donations are dropping off as sales are plummeting. “Most of the hotels that
were giving us their surplus are now closed. They used to represent more than 40% of the food donations we receive in Bangkok and 80% in Phuket! If we don’t do anything, we won’t be able to feed the most vulnerables.” says Bo H. Holmgreen, founder of SOS.

Food banks need new supply sources to keep up with the rising demand. “We are serving over 378,000 meals per month to
orphanages, homeless shelters and low-income communities. WE CANNOT STOP NOW! We are adapting quickly and we already found new food donors, especially farmers in the countryside. To collect their food donations, it means buying more materials, increasing transportation costs, maybe purchasing a dedicated truck,” assume Bo. There’s been a tremendous warm-hearted generosity from the Thai people and companies at various level. Now, this is not going to be enough, Thailand needs more long term help.

Scholars of Sustenance, one of the most important Food Charity in Thailand, is sending an S-O-S to the Thai People to
participate and support their actions. Every baht counts in the fight against food insecurity. Each rescued meal-equivalent
represents a cost of just 5 baht to collect and deliver. That means that every 450 Baht, $13, you feed a child or its’ mother for
a month! Be someone’s hero today and give at https://www.weeboon.com/en/campaign/sosfoodrescue.

This funding will be used to expand SOSs’ capabilities during COVID-19’s exceptional time. Specifically, the areas that the company will focus on are:
• [Area of focus #1] Collect food from new donors like farmers and manufacturers
• [Area of focus #2] Distribute at least 100,000 meals to people in need during
• [Area of focus #3] Buy protective gears for our workers and volunteers

About Scholars of Sustenance:
Established in 2012 in Thailand and in 2016 in Indonesia, SOS is an international food rescue foundation with operations in Thailand and Indonesia. They collect edible food surplus in supermarkets and restaurants that otherwise would end up in landfills and redistribute it to communities in need, such as homeless shelters, orphanages and more. Some SOS (Bangkok and Phuket) accomplishments to date: 3.9 million meals served, 995 tons of food saved, and 1,890.5 tons of CO2 reduced. For more information, please visit www.scholarsofsustenance.org or send you inquiry to [email protected]

###

You wish to see SOS in action? We are running our action 7 days a week so feel free to contact Ms. Apinya 062-675-0004 or
email to [email protected], and we can easily add you on the team if you wish to organize a video or
photoshoot.

FOR RELEASE ON: 19th May, 2020
Contact: Ms. Apinya Amnuayskul, Scholars of Sustenance Foundation
Phone Number: 062-675-0004
Email: [email protected]

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The new coronavirus pandemic is continuing to wreak havoc on people from all walks of life. But perhaps no one has been hit harder in the Thai capital than a group of deaf people living underneath a section of the Rama IX expressway.

While not every member of the 112-strong community is deaf, a large number, 43, are.

Before the onset of Covid-19, several of them regularly toiled away at the nearby RCA night entertainment venue, either at restaurants or by selling flowers and other wares to nightclub patrons. Others simply collected bottles and other recyclables, which they later turned in for money.

But after the pandemic hit, the venue was shuttered, leaving the members of this community without a way to make ends meet.

They currently live three to four in 20-square-metre rooms, primarily fashioned from sheets of plywood. All of the deaf residents share bathrooms and toilets. Their common area is a path between rows of conjoined rooms.

He works as a mechanic repairing motorcycles and electrical appliances and also produces custom-made aluminium racks for customers. Other deaf people followed him to the settlement, asking if they could live there.

Some have come from other provinces while other natives of the capital without there own homes moved in so they wouldn’t be a burden on their families, he said.

Mr Sombat allows them to share tap water and electricity, which costs him between 8,000 and 9,000 baht a month. All of them help split the electricity and tap water bills and try to use them sparingly.

In Mr Sombat’s house is a sizeable metal cabinet he uses to store tools he has been collecting for years. He is very proud of his collection, saying he had bought them with money he has earned through his labour. He also has a small metal box which he has fashioned into a piggy bank.

“Anytime I’ve got some coins I drop them into the box. Sometimes this money goes to helping other deaf people in need. Other times I use it to buy new tools,” he said.

Mr Sombat has also taught other deaf people in the community how to make aluminium racks and stands so they can earn a living by selling them to clothing vendors in Patpong and around Sukhumvit. These vendors are also deaf.

Their plight has come to the attention of the Social Development and Human Security Ministry, which is now looking to give a helping hand.

Social Development and Human Security Minister Chuti Krairiksh, who recently led a team to visit them, said he would like to ask everyone there to consider moving to live into flats being provided by the National Housing Authority.

The residence is far away from their settlement, and each tenant would be required to pay 999 baht a month for rent, said the minister. But the rental fee will be waived for the first three months and three free meals will be provided each day, as well as occupational training, said Mr Chuti.

He added a team will be sent next week to lead Mr Sombat and his community to visit their new potential living quarters.

During a previous visit to the settlement, the Department of Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities handed out bags of food and other necessities to the deaf residents and took down their personal information for their records in case help was needed.

All of those who are already registered are entitled to receive 1,000 baht in financial aid being offered to disabled people during the Covid-19 outbreak, said the department.

The department is also carrying out a large-scale survey of disabled people to ensure that all of them can receive government assistance.

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The coronavirus outbreak hit some families hard and some are without income and in need of basic food. Community pantries, stocked with basic, yet essential, food items have been popping up all over Thailand to help the hungry and people simply knocked sideways by the suddenness of the impact from the outbreak.

The project is called “Pantry of Sharing.” One sign says “Please feel free to take anything you need, and leave anything you can share.” Another sign says “More Give. More Love.

People leave items like instant noodles, sauces, seasonings, canned fish, bottled water, eggs and medicines. Others take what they need.

Over the past few weeks, the pantries have been spotted all over the country from Chiang Mai to southern provinces like Surat Thani and Nakhon Si Thammarat.

There are food-sharing projects all over the world, like Australia’s Foodbank and the Little Free Pantry Movement in the US. Supakit Kulchartvijit said he got the idea from similar projects and decided to start a food-sharing project in Thailand.

“When I started this idea with others, they were worried that people would take away all items or even steal the cabinet,” he told the Nation Thailand. “We set up four cabinets in Bangkok and another one in Rayong province.”

“During the past two weeks, people were gradually putting items on the shelves while those had been hurt by the outbreak took items as needed.”

While worried at first that some people would be greedy and take all of the food items, Kulchartvijit said people have been generous, continuing to stock the pantries. In Khon Kaen, a local decided to start a pantry in the Isan city, placing the cupboard outside an auto showroom on a busy street.

“I saw community pantries in other provinces and wanted to have one here in Khon Kaen.”

SOURCES: Bangkok Post | Nation Thailand | Coconuts Bangkok

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The American Women’s Club of Thailand Community Projects Team, led by Linda Jennings and Catherine Culwell kicked off the first of many community projects we hope to complete over the next few weeks and months to help those that have been severely impacted by the current Covid-19 Pandemic. 
 
The 1500 Khlong Toei Meal Box Project consisted of creating 1,500 Meal Boxes of Chicken, Rice & Boiled Eggs that were then distributed inside Khlong Toei in coordination with the Duang Prateep Foundation and Khlong Toei Community Leader Khun Fai who helped identify the need for the community to us. 
 
A huge THANK YOU goes out to the amazing Anantara Siam Team, without their assistance, guidance and kitchen facilities, I am not sure we would have been able to pull this off as easily as we did.
 
A special recognition to the team that pulled this all together and made it happen. 
Linda Jennings – AWC Community Projects Lead 
Catherine Culwell – AWC Community Projects
Jenny Littlewood – AWC
Libby Heath – AWC
Maxine Margolis – AWC
 
Daniel Simon – General Manager, Anantara Siam
Khun Apisak – Banquet Chef, Anantara Siam
Khun Pongsri – Anantara Siam
Khun Patcharee  – Anantara Siam
Khun Nah  – Anantara Siam
Kun Chalida – Anantara Siam
 
Lily Aphiwan Sungden- LocalAlike
Khun Fai – Khlong Toei Community Leader
Duang Prateep Foundation
 
Thank you all for volunteering your time, knowledge and experience in making the 1,500 Khlong Toei Meal Box Project a success. 
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With Thailand and the rest of the world facing untold hardships in the wake of the Covid-19, good news can be hard to find. However, Shrewsbury International School Bangkok, Riverside is changing that trend with a combination of charitable donations to organisations in need, with staff and students pulling together to bring some joy back to the community. 

Shrewsbury’s Charity Committee, led by Ms Carol Simcox and Mr Paul Williams has facilitated the purchase of 300 items of medical-grade personal protective equipment (PPE) to be distributed to nine hospitals in Bangkok including Siriraj and Chulalongkorn in Bangkok. In addition, 100 face masks have delivered to the ‘Mirror Foundation’, at a total cost of over 150,000 THB. 

While financial stimulus is essential, perhaps even more incredible are members of the Shrewsbury community, including the wonderful staff, teachers and students who have given donations, their time, and resources to improve the well-being of those on the front line – our doctors and nurses.

Using materials, again funded by their Charity Committee, staff and parents, Shrewsbury is even creating PPE using the Design Technology (DT) department. A true hero, Khun Pui (Pichet Jivapong), the resident DT technician, has designed and manufactured – using a 3D printer, face shields for those treating patients most in need at BMA General Hospital, while preventing infection. He started with ten last week and has completed another 30 since then. Aiming to create 100, his ingenuity, expertise and kind heart could save lives during this pandemic and this is something he and the Shrewsbury community can feel very proud of, indeed

The generous undertaking Shrewsbury has committed to hospitals and medical staff is just one of the ways the schools is helping out those in need. On a side note, a further 20,000 THB given to emergency personnel in rural areas which are, unfortunately, also battling wildfires in Thailand’s beautiful national parks. 

As Covid-19 and the fires in the north continue to play havoc with the daily lives of everyday Thais our minds can also shift to those who are less fortunate. Their struggles, in many cases, are ten-fold and Shrewsbury are working hard to alleviate stress and uncertainty they face on a day-to-day basis. According to Ms Simcox, a further 50,000 THB has been allocated to our regular charitable partner, ‘Thailand SOS’ to keep their organisation operational in a period when they cannot collect surplus food and clothing due to national closures.

Above all else, Shrewsbury wants to thank the medical professionals, hospital staff and local communities, for handling this difficult situation with grace and a steely determination to see it through to the end. 

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DPF activities on Covid-19

by Expat Life
Dear DPF Benefactors,                 
 
I would like to thank you for your kindness in supporting the Duang Prateep Foundation. I would like to report how the Thai government has responded to the Covid-19 virus, as follows:
  1. Announced a curfew and ordered the closure of various establishments and locations. These include: – restaurants (except take-away services); shopping malls (except supermarkets and pharmacies); – markets (except fresh markets); – exhibition halls; – schools and educational institutions; – barbers, beauty salons, and tattoo shops; – game and internet shops; – golf courses and sports clubs; – beauty and cosmetic clinics, spas, massage parlors, and saunas; – theaters; – boxing stadiums and schools and horse racing clubs; and – other establishments similar to the above.
 

2. Thailand’s 20 million informal workers and the people who are out of work, registered with the government in order to get 5,000 baht per month in cash for 5 months in cash. 

 From the information of Klong Toey District Office it was found that there are 13 people in Klong Toey infected with Covid-19.

DPF realizes to this dangerous situation of spreading Covid-19, so DPF is re-acting as follows: (Please see the attached photos)

1. DPF hired the community people who are out of work to spray the sanitizing agent in and around to the people’s houses.

2. Campaign to give knowledge to children, youths and elder citizens on Covid-19 protection

3. Home visiting to provide food and essential things to the bed-ridden elderly citizens, and the people who are out of works with no income.

4. Hire some people who are out of work to survey the total number of the people who are out of work, or laid off due to Covid-19 situation

5.Hire the housewives group to produce fabric masks, cleaning gel and face shields for the children and people in Klong Toey communities, which will give them some income to support their families. 

On behalf of the Duang Prateep Foundation, I would like to thank all our benefactors who support the poor children, elder citizens and community people.

Even though we all face the situation of Covid-19 that affects Thailand and the rest of the world but staff, children & youths and I are ready to combat the threat from the virus. Please stay safe, all our benefactors. Thank you very much.

 

Sincerely yours,

Prateep Ungsongtham Hata
Founder and Secretary-general
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